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It's what you learn that counts!

Professor Mike Hulme

Member of staff, Department of Geography, King's College London.

 

Believe it or not Mike first got interested in climate through his passion for cricket - weather and statistics are important for both!  He studied geography at university and has spent his whole career researching into climate change, human responses and cultural meanings and has now recently arrived at King’s College as professor of climate and culture. He has advised governments, businesses, NGOs and appears frequently on the media.

Relevant resources:

2013 (Paper) Ways of Knowing: Traditional Knowledge as Key Insight for Addressing Environmental Change, Rudiak-Gould.

 

2009 (Book) Why we disagree about climate change, Hulme, M.

 

2009 (films) -The Indigenous Voices on Climate Change film festival -click here for  22 films and see to the right for an example

Introductory talk summary:

Is it possible to see global climate changing – and is it possible to see what’s causing it?  In this short talk before the screening of ‘Chasing Ice’, I will offer some ways in which scientists and campaigners have tried to make climate change visible – and also some of the ways the popular media try to visualise climate change.  I will suggest that maybe in the end what you see is what you believe.

More about the speaker:

Hulme UN-CROPPED-Chasing_ice-JPG-good-quality-for-web

This event is now in the past -for recordings of the talk and post-screening Q&A please click here.

As the sea level rises, Nicholas Hakata, and his family have been surviving on fish and coconuts, and battling malaria-infected swamp mosquitoes. Hungry and frustrated, islanders have set up their own relocation team and have begun the urgent task of moving their families closer to safety.